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Đ.Ỏ.Я.ŕ
25-03-09, 06:40 PM





(q41)


(qq15)

Habits

(q62)
(qq15)

(q41)

..

:gg4mpup:

(wtg)

25-03-09, 07:25 PM
bad habits and behaviors in children

What do I need to know about bad habits and behaviors in children?

Parents find many habits and behaviors of their children annoying. When you want to change an unwanted behavior, it helps to first understand why your child is doing it. Often bad habits are just a coping strategy. Your child may fall back on these behaviors when they are stressed, bored, tired, frustrated, unhappy, insecure, or falling asleep. Many of these bad habits are calming and soothing to the child.
Most of the time, these behaviors are just phases or habitsnot serious medical problemsand the child typically outgrows them. Managing them can be difficult, however. In general, you should ignore bad habits. Yelling, calling attention to the habit and punishment do not usually work to stop the behavior (and may even increase it!), but praise, positive rewards, and patience are likely to help.
What about thumb and finger sucking and pacifiers?
There are different types of sucking kids might do their infancy and childhood. Thumb and finger sucking typically starts in the first few months of life. Many babies outgrow it well before their first birthday, and most stop by age five years due to peer pressure. Other sucking objects include pacifiers and blankets. (Get some tips on choosing a safe pacifier from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).
Sucking has a soothing, calming effect, and often helps kids get to sleep. However, it may become worrisome when the permanent teeth start coming in (around age five) if the sucking alters the shape of the child's teeth, palate or bite. Get more information on this from the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. For more tips on how to help your child quit sucking,

Đ.Ỏ.Я.ŕ
25-03-09, 08:29 PM
..(qq15)

..

..:gg4mpup:

Đ.Ỏ.Я.ŕ
26-03-09, 12:55 AM
..

..

26-03-09, 02:03 AM
Problem Behaviors With Children

HYG-5260-96

Melinda J. Hill
All children have behavior problems, some being harder to accept than others. Some of these behaviors can cause children to be aggressive, hostile and difficult to handle, which may emphasize their respective limitations. As parents we are our children's first and foremost teacher. We need to establish our plan for accomplishing rules and expectations.
"Why Does He/She Act This Way?"

When children react with aggression towards what was seemingly a simple request the underlying principle may be one of frustration. If tasks they could accomplish yesterday can't be done today, they become angry. If the tasks become more difficult or more restrictions are applied, they may react with anger.
When expectations are raised, children may become fearful that they can't accomplish what is expected. The fear may become overwhelming causing children to react to others in a negative manner. The type of aggression exhibited is determined by the problems that are presented. Sometimes subtle actions like not eating their food or bedwetting may be their response. Sometimes more violent actions become a way of controlling the situation. It becomes clear that even if the children can't communicate their frustration, they can act out the frustration and achieve attention.
"How Can I Deal With This Behavior?"

Balancing children's needs for independence along with your authority is one of a parent's greatest challenges. Remember that children's awareness of being able to choose not to comply with a command also means they are learning the first step in being able to choose outcomes. Be mindful of the individual child's age and developmental level when choosing your actions. Keep in mind the following tips as you are dealing with difficult behaviors:

Know that discipline is not punishment. Discipline is training to help a child learn control of himself or herself.

Realize the child's limitations and set expectations accordingly. Don't set the child or yourself up for defeat and more frustration.

Learn to recognize early warning signs of frustration in your child. When children are approached with a problem or situation that they don't know how to handle, anxiety begins to take over.
Know what signs your child exhibits and offer other choices if possible. If, on the other hand, the child is just looking to you for support, lend a smile and let them venture on for themselves. This will develop confidence, improved skills and self control.

Develop a discipline plan. Decide ahead of time how to deal with incidence of misbehavior. Planning and practice will lessen the anger and distress of the behavior.

Use "time out" to remove the child from the situation and to allow the child to practice self control. A "time out" area could be a chair in the corner, a step, or anyplace where the child does not have access to toys, television, or other activities. Appropriate times would be one minute for each year of age. At the completion of the "time out" a discussion should follow to identify the reason for the "time out" and what other options might have been chosen. Ideally, when placed in situations where the child is unsure what behavior is appropriate, he or she will remove himself or herself in the same manner to re-establish self control.

Recognize that sometimes no reaction is the best answer. Nonreaction is useful for behaviors that are not aggressive, like whining or pestering. If adults intervene too early on a situation, children don't have a chance to meet the challenge themselves and don't acquire new skills.

Once you decide to respond to the child, do so quickly. The delay of your response until a task is finished or a conversation completed takes away from its effectiveness.

Be consistent in the warnings you give and the consequence involved. Begging or whining should not change the outcome of the consequence.

Be sure you have the child's attention when you are discussing the problem at hand. Take hold of the child's hands or wrists, look at him or her in the eye, and ask the child to look at you as you are talking. If the child cannot verbalize clearly, identify a way, like blinking of their eyes or moving hands that the child can help identify the problem.

Don't wait until you lose your temper to react to the child's behavior. Know your own warning signs as well and react accordingly. Sometimes parents need a "time out" too.

Know that rewards can be helpful in managing behavior if they help to establish a routine. However, improvements in behavior totally relying on rewards are short-lived and lack the lesson of self control. The reward of finding a toy to play with that was returned to the shelf after playing the last time, is an example of establishing a routine.

26-03-09, 02:53 PM
hhhhhhhhhhh

hay guys
she wants it short to be easy 4 her


thaaaanx 4 your great efforts

26-03-09, 03:08 PM
hhhhhhhhhhh

hay guys
she wants it short to be easy 4 her


thaaaanx 4 your great efforts

get 1/4 of it hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

27-03-09, 01:04 AM
get 1/4 of it hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh



(qq166)

no please make it shorter for her

27-03-09, 01:39 PM
(qq166)

no please make it shorter for her
When children react with aggression towards what was seemingly a simple request the underlying principle may be one of frustration. If tasks they could accomplish yesterday can't be done today, they become angry. If the tasks become more difficult or more restrictions are applied, they may react with anger.
When expectations are raised, children may become fearful that they can't accomplish what is expected. The fear may become overwhelming causing children to react to others in a negative manner. The type of aggression exhibited is determined by the problems that are presented. Sometimes subtle actions like not eating their food or bedwetting may be their response. Sometimes more violent actions become a way of controlling the situation. It becomes clear that even if the children can't communicate their frustration, they can act out the frustration and achieve attention.
"How Can I Deal With This Behavior?"

27-03-09, 02:59 PM
When children react with aggression towards what was seemingly a simple request the underlying principle may be one of frustration. If tasks they could accomplish yesterday can't be done today, they become angry. If the tasks become more difficult or more restrictions are applied, they may react with anger.
When expectations are raised, children may become fearful that they can't accomplish what is expected. The fear may become overwhelming causing children to react to others in a negative manner. The type of aggression exhibited is determined by the problems that are presented. Sometimes subtle actions like not eating their food or bedwetting may be their response. Sometimes more violent actions become a way of controlling the situation. It becomes clear that even if the children can't communicate their frustration, they can act out the frustration and achieve attention.
"How Can I Deal With This Behavior?"



great e.p

many thaaanx;star1;

Đ.Ỏ.Я.ŕ
27-03-09, 05:13 PM
Problem Behaviors With Children

HYG-5260-96

Melinda J. Hill
All children have behavior problems, some being harder to accept than others. Some of these behaviors can cause children to be aggressive, hostile and difficult to handle, which may emphasize their respective limitations. As parents we are our children's first and foremost teacher. We need to establish our plan for accomplishing rules and expectations.
"Why Does He/She Act This Way?"

When children react with aggression towards what was seemingly a simple request the underlying principle may be one of frustration. If tasks they could accomplish yesterday can't be done today, they become angry. If the tasks become more difficult or more restrictions are applied, they may react with anger.
When expectations are raised, children may become fearful that they can't accomplish what is expected. The fear may become overwhelming causing children to react to others in a negative manner. The type of aggression exhibited is determined by the problems that are presented. Sometimes subtle actions like not eating their food or bedwetting may be their response. Sometimes more violent actions become a way of controlling the situation. It becomes clear that even if the children can't communicate their frustration, they can act out the frustration and achieve attention.
"How Can I Deal With This Behavior?"


Balancing children's needs for independence along with your authority is one of a parent's greatest challenges. Remember that children's awareness of being able to choose not to comply with a command also means they are learning the first step in being able to choose outcomes. Be mindful of the individual child's age and developmental level when choosing your actions. Keep in mind the following tips as you are dealing with difficult behaviors:

Know that discipline is not punishment. Discipline is training to help a child learn control of himself or herself.

Realize the child's limitations and set expectations accordingly. Don't set the child or yourself up for defeat and more frustration.

Learn to recognize early warning signs of frustration in your child. When children are approached with a problem or situation that they don't know how to handle, anxiety begins to take over.
Know what signs your child exhibits and offer other choices if possible. If, on the other hand, the child is just looking to you for support, lend a smile and let them venture on for themselves. This will develop confidence, improved skills and self control.

Develop a discipline plan. Decide ahead of time how to deal with incidence of misbehavior. Planning and practice will lessen the anger and distress of the behavior.

Use "time out" to remove the child from the situation and to allow the child to practice self control. A "time out" area could be a chair in the corner, a step, or anyplace where the child does not have access to toys, television, or other activities. Appropriate times would be one minute for each year of age. At the completion of the "time out" a discussion should follow to identify the reason for the "time out" and what other options might have been chosen. Ideally, when placed in situations where the child is unsure what behavior is appropriate, he or she will remove himself or herself in the same manner to re-establish self control.

Recognize that sometimes no reaction is the best answer. Nonreaction is useful for behaviors that are not aggressive, like whining or pestering. If adults intervene too early on a situation, children don't have a chance to meet the challenge themselves and don't acquire new skills.

Once you decide to respond to the child, do so quickly. The delay of your response until a task is finished or a conversation completed takes away from its effectiveness.

Be consistent in the warnings you give and the consequence involved. Begging or whining should not change the outcome of the consequence.

Be sure you have the child's attention when you are discussing the problem at hand. Take hold of the child's hands or wrists, look at him or her in the eye, and ask the child to look at you as you are talking. If the child cannot verbalize clearly, identify a way, like blinking of their eyes or moving hands that the child can help identify the problem.

Don't wait until you lose your temper to react to the child's behavior. Know your own warning signs as well and react accordingly. Sometimes parents need a "time out" too.

Know that rewards can be helpful in managing behavior if they help to establish a routine. However, improvements in behavior totally relying on rewards are short-lived and lack the lesson of self control. The reward of finding a toy to play with that was returned to the shelf after playing the last time, is an example of establishing a routine.





O M G

THAT IS SO LONG
(qq84)

(vv)

Đ.Ỏ.Я.ŕ
27-03-09, 05:20 PM
When children react with aggression towards what was seemingly a simple request the underlying principle may be one of frustration. If tasks they could accomplish yesterday can't be done today, they become angry. If the tasks become more difficult or more restrictions are applied, they may react with anger.
When expectations are raised, children may become fearful that they can't accomplish what is expected. The fear may become overwhelming causing children to react to others in a negative manner. The type of aggression exhibited is determined by the problems that are presented. Sometimes subtle actions like not eating their food or bedwetting may be their response. Sometimes more violent actions become a way of controlling the situation. It becomes clear that even if the children can't communicate their frustration, they can act out the frustration and achieve attention.
"How Can I Deal With This Behavior?"




thank you a lot:g8546:
thaaaaaanx(qq172)

Dr.memo
27-03-09, 05:21 PM

Đ.Ỏ.Я.ŕ
27-03-09, 05:30 PM
(qq166)

no please make it shorter for her


:gcr852: yaaa that is right I want it shorter

Đ.Ỏ.Я.ŕ
27-03-09, 05:31 PM


(vv)

Đ.Ỏ.Я.ŕ
27-03-09, 05:32 PM
get 1/4 of it hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh




(vv)
(vv)

Đ.Ỏ.Я.ŕ
27-03-09, 05:37 PM
THANKS

...... , * * , *22*

(qq22)

27-03-09, 06:56 PM
happy that u get what u want